Tag Archives: teen driving

Teen Driving Safety

20 Oct

National Teen Driver Safety week is coming to an end, but that does not mean that you can’t keep the conversation going and keep reminding your teen how to drive safely. You can get creative and send them emails, text messages, use social media, or leave sticky notes in the car. Keep reminding them the rules of the road:

  1. No Drinking and Driving.

Set a good example by not driving after drinking. Remind your teen that drinking before the age of 21 is illegal, and alcohol and driving should never mix, no matter your age. Also remind them that driving under the influence of any impairing substance, including illicit or prescription drugs, could have deadly consequences.

  1. Buckle Up. Every Trip. Every Time. Everyone—Front Seat and Back.

Lead by example. If you wear your seat belt every time you’re in the car, your teen is more likely to follow suit. Remind your teen that it’s important to buckle up on every trip, every time, no matter what (both in the front and back seats).

  1. Eyes on the Road, Hands on the Wheel. All the Time.

Remind your teen about the dangers of texting, dialing, or using mobile apps while driving. Have them make their phone off-limits when they are on the road and turn on the “Do Not Disturb” or similar feature on their phone. Distracted driving isn’t limited to phone use; other passengers, audio and climate controls in the vehicle, and eating or drinking while driving are all sources of dangerous distractions for teen drivers.
Obey All Posted Speed Limits.

Speeding is a critical issue for all drivers, especially for teens who lack the experience to react to changing circumstances around their cars. Obey the speed limit, and require your teen to do the same. Explain that every time the speed you’re driving doubles, the distance your car will travel when you try to stop quadruples.

With each passenger in the vehicle, your teen’s risk of a fatal crash goes up. NJ’s Law restricts passengers to 1 with exception for driver’s dependents.

  1. Avoid Driving Tired.

It’s easy for your teen to lose track of time while doing homework or participating in extracurricular activities, so make sure they get what they need most—a good night’s sleep.

And remind them that NJ’s nighttime driving restriction is 11:00PM to 5:00AM.

Stay safe!

 

Source: NHTSA.org

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October 18th- 24th is Teen Driver Safety Week

16 Oct

Parents, take some time next week to start the driving risks conversation with your teen. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration ( NHTSA) designated October 18th to October 24th Teen Driver Safety Week. Teens may be a little, let’s say… apprehensive about the topic, but this NHTSA “5 to Drive” campaign is a good way to make them listen. Statistics show that car crashes are the leading cause of death among teenagers, 15 – 19 years old. Many of these fatal car crashes have these causes in common:  cellphone use while driving, speeding, drugs and alcohol, having extra passengers in the car, and not wearing a seat belt.

Source: trafficsafetymarketing.gov

Source: trafficsafetymarketing.gov

That is why the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommends that parents impose the following rules:

  1. No cell phone use while driving – When you are distracted, your reaction time slows down,  you can’t execute emergency maneuvers, and you are less likely to be able to avoid collisions with other vehicles.
  2. No speeding – Every time you increase your speed, the stopping distance increases, and your chance of being able to control the car decreases.
  3. No alcohol – Driving impaired impacts your reaction time, your judgment, your vision, and it is not legal.
  4. No extra passengers – No more than one passenger at all times. When you have more than one passenger in the car, the risk of getting distracted increases and so is the risk of getting into an accident.
  5. No driving or riding without a seatbelt – Wearing a seatbelt can significantly reduce your chances of being seriously injured or even killed in a car crash. You and your passenger have to wear a seatbelt.

For more information, resources, and statistics regarding teen driving, please visit www.safercar.gov/parents .

And as always, stay safe!

Sources:  http://www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov/teens

National Safety Month Tips

12 Jun

June is National Safety Month and the focus this year, among other things, is on learning more about transportation safety.

Car crashes are still the leading cause of unintentional death in US but we can change that if we take steps to ensure safety.

To begin, don’t be an aggressive driver! More than half of all traffic fatalities are the result of aggressive driving.  Bring your patience along on every trip!  For signs of aggressive driving go here .

Don’t use your cell phone while you’re driving.  Doing other activities while driving – like texting or eating – distracts you and increases your chance of crashing. Almost 1 in 5 crashes (17%) that injured someone involved distracted driving.

Get enough rest and do not drive until you know how certain medications might affect you. Drowsy driving leads to more than 1500 people being killed each year.

nhtsa.gov

nhtsa.gov

If your teen just started driving take them to practice driving once a week, limit night time driving, and limit the number of passengers in their car. A great resource for parents of teen drivers  can be found here.

Other transportation safety tips to consider:

Car Seat Safety – Here is a checklist of things to consider when installing a car seat.

Never leave your children or your pets in a hot car – The temperature inside a car can get close to the temperature of a hot oven. Even if you are just running into a store for a few minutes, take your child or pet with you! A list of tips on how to avoid that can be found here.

Brakes Safety Carcare.org is advising us to look for the following signs that might indicate something is wrong with the brakes:

Noise: screeching, grinding or clicking noises when applying the brakes.

Pulling: vehicle pulls to one side while braking.

Low Pedal: brake pedal nearly touches the floor before engaging.

Hard Pedal: must apply extreme pressure to the pedal before brakes engage.

Grabbing: brakes grab at the slightest touch to the pedal.

Vibration: brake pedal vibrates or pulses, even under normal braking conditions.

Light: brake light is illuminated on your vehicle’s dashboard.

With more and more people switching to bikes for their transportation needs, it is important to keep in mind the following bike safety tips:

  1. Be predictable and signal your intentions to others:
  • When you turn left, extend your left arm to your side
  • When you turn right, hold your arm up an “L” shape or extend your right arm
  • If you want to stop or slow down, hold your arm down in a “L” shape
  1. Go with the flow of traffic not against it
  2. Be ready to stop at driveways
  3. Make yourself visible, wear something reflective, have a white light in the front of you bike and a red light on the back, mirrors, and bell
  4. Wear a helmet

Enjoy your summer and be safe!

Other sources: healthfinder.gov, http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles