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Calling All Artists Grades 3 – 5!

16 Feb

The fifth Safe Routes to School Bookmark Design contest is now underway.  Calling Mercer County and Ocean County students in third through fifth grade to show their love of walking by creating an original haiku poem and then illustrate it. The theme of the contest is “Write and draw about USING YOUR SENSES WHILE WALKING AND BIKING. What kind of things do you hear, touch, smell, or see?”

At the end of the contest, we will choose four winners, two from Mercer County and two from Ocean County. The winning bookmark design will be printed and distributed to area schools and local libraries.  The winners will also receive a $50 gift card each.

For more information about the contest, entry form, and the Safe Routes to School Program go to gmtma.org.

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National Wear Red Day

2 Feb

Today, February 2, is Go Red for Women Day, wear red to raise awareness about cardiovascular disease and help save lives. In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. But heart disease is preventable, and by increasing awareness, we can make a difference.

In addition to knowing your numbers (total cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, and BMI), being physically active helps prevent heart disease. There are many ways to stay active while going about your day. Here are a few ideas:

Staying active while commuting

Studies have shown that active commuting is positively associated with fitness in both men and women, and walking is seen as the most accessible way to increase physical activity.  Also, research shows that active commuting increases adherence to activity recommendations.  When walking or biking the entire commute isn’t possible try incorporating these activities by walking or biking to transit to help achieve your physical activity goals.

Commuting alone is stressful so try joining a carpool or vanpool to reduce the stress of your commute and meet new people.

Staying active around the house

Cleaning your house, doing dishes, gardening, washing the car, carrying groceries and organizing them in your pantry and other chores can help you keep active.

Kids and families activities to keep active 

Kids need at least 60 minutes of exercise per day to stay healthy.  It is best if they can go outdoors and play, bike, hike, and other activities. Allowing your children to walk to school is an easy way for both you and your kids to be active every day. But there are many fun ways to stay active indoors as well – use a Wii Fit to play tennis, baseball, etc., hula hoop, freeze dance, scavenger hunt, balloon volleyball, and more.

Seniors staying active

Walking is a great way for seniors to keep active, but other activities such as swimming and water aerobics can be beneficial for people who can’t walk.

We hope you can incorporate some of these ideas into your daily routine. If you need help finding new ways to incorporate more activity into your daily commute, let us know, we would be happy to help.

Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2736383/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16905031/

https://www.todaysparent.com/family/activities/15-ways-to-keep-kids-active-indoors-even-if-you-dont-have-much-space/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/fight-heart-disease-women-go-red-women-official-site/get-involved/national-wear-red-day/

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyKids/ActivitiesforKids/Activities-for-Kids_UCM_304155_SubHomePage.jsp

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/PhysicalActivity/GettingActive/Family-Fitness_UCM_462373_Article.jsp

Winter Biking Tips

5 Dec

December 21st is the first day of winter but we’ve already seen snow and it already feels a lot like winter.

We’ve had some tips on how to prepare your car for winter and winter driving tips, now how about some winter biking tips for those of you who will be braving the elements this winter?!?

  1. Layer up but do not overdress – look for clothing that is designed to keep you warm without being too bulky and make you sweat. Many stores sell active wear clothes that are both fashionable and functional. Cover your head, your extremities and your ears, and wear clear glasses to protect your eyes.
  2. Wear something bright and equip your bike with good lights (flashing lights have a great battery life but the high powered ones can blind the motorists behind you), it will keep you safe during low visibility conditions.
  3. Equip your bike with wide tires (studded winter tires are best for icy conditions) and shoes with threaded sole so you won’t slip when you break or stop at a light and you have to put your foot down.
  4. If possible, pick streets that will minimize your contact with cars.
  5. Think safety first! – Use your judgment in snowy, slippery and/or low visibility conditions, actively manage risk through strategies to avoid travel, minimize contact with other traffic and/or make yourself as visible as possible through proper lane positioning

attAs part of our Be Safe Be Seen campaign we giveaway reflective bands, reflective vests, and reflective decals for your helmet.  If you are a bike commuter and would like to get these items, please contact us.

Here is a great Infographic from www.bikearlington.com with more winter biking tips.

WinterBikeArlington

Bike Commuter Journal – High Gear to Happiness

14 Nov

Lifebycycle_Commuter Journal

Our guest blogger this week, Robert Stasio, is sharing some thoughts about cycling.

I’ve been commuting to work in the Plainsboro and West Windsor area on and off for 8 years, and bikes were always a central focus of my life. Post-college, the bike was replaced with the car, shuttling from one commitment to the next. With increasing work responsibilities, I lost sight of what matters most. I started focusing on convenience over happiness and status over health. After a few years the longer car commutes, office lunches, and stress started taking a mental and physical toll. Gym memberships collected dust, and bigger pants couldn’t solve the problems any longer. Suddenly I didn’t recognize myself. A year ago I had an “awakening” and realized it was time for a number of changes, including a commitment to consistently commute by bike no matter what.

Today, it’s going well. As it turns out, this area is actually amazing for biking to work, to the store, or just for fun. Often it’s actually EASIER than driving. You have your choice of bike lanes, bike paths, or even roads, and it’s getting even better thanks to the hard work of many people.  More importantly, there is a growing tolerance on the roads, and most drivers are also closet bicyclists just waiting to start bike commuting as well. You can even expand your biking with a simple bus or train excursion.

My commute brings me past the beautiful fields of Stult’s Farm, down the boulevard-esque bike lanes of Southfield Road, and even through Mercer County Park, where I routinely pass dozens of deer. I’ve also rode in rain, floods, and snow, and enjoyed every minute. I take in the beautiful scenery and admire the changing seasons, all from the seat of my bike.

Riding a bike is more than just exercise or cost savings; it’s fun too. It’s the high gear to happiness!

Thank you Robert!

If you have a commuting story you would like to share, please contact us.