Archive | December, 2015

Holiday Travel Driving Safety Tips and Transit Schedules

18 Dec

According the AAA Year-End Travel Forecast, a record 100.5 million people will be traveling for the holidays this year.  With gas prices much lower than previous years, many people choose to drive to their destination, although travel by other modes of transportation will increase as well.

If you are driving, please check our winter driving safety tips before you hit the road  and check out these AAA  winter driving tips .

If you are taking public transit:

NJ Transit – Bus Service Christmas Day and New Year’s Day – Weekend Schedule, no service on  603, 610, 611, 612

Bicycles permitted at all times

Rail Service – Weekend Service on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Bicycles are not permitted on trains on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Riverline – Sunday Schedule for Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Bicycles permitted at all times

Amtrak –Schedules available here 

AirTranhttp://www.panynj.gov/airports/ewr-to-from.html

SEPTA – Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Schedule

PATH – Christmas Day on Saturday Schedule, New Year’s Day on modified weekday schedule

FreeB – No Service on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Route 130 Connection – No service on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Tiger Transit – December 24, 25, 31, and January 1st no service

Suburban – Christmas Day and New Year’s Day on a Sunday Schedule

Ocean Ride – No Service on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Ride Provide – No service on Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

Whether you will be travelling or spending the Holidays at home, all of us at GMTMA would like to wish you Happy and Safe Holidays!

December is National Impaired Driving Prevention Month

11 Dec

From December 16th to January 1st, NHTSA will run the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over Campaign to raise awareness and prevent drunk driving. Every year during the winter holidays there is an increase in the number of drunk-driving crashes and according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, 32,719 people were killed in motor vehicle traffic crashes in 2013, and 10,076 of those fatalities occurred in drunk-driving-related crashes. The most dangerous times are nights and weekends.
card Be prepared and have a plan in place before going out. Have a designated driver if you plan to drink, call a cab or try NHTSA’s SaferRide mobile app, which allows users to call a taxi or a friend by identifying their location so they can be picked up. The app is available at http://ow.ly/RWs3S for Android and http://ow.ly/RWs8h for iPhone users.

Another option for planning a night out, a company holiday gathering or other social events and trips, is to hire a professional driver to get you there safely and in comfort. Greater Mercer TMA members: A1-Limousine, Starr Tours, and Stout’s Transportation have limousines and buses available to ferry you and your guests to holiday.

Other things you can do to keep the Happy in Holidays are: helping other people be responsible, if someone you know has been drinking, don’t let them drive and if you see a drunk driver, call the police.

And check out this infographic for information about blood alcohol concentration and what it takes to reach .08.

Source: http://www.trafficsafetymarketing.gov

 

Winter Safety Tips

4 Dec

December 22st is the first day of winter and although we have enjoyed a long stretch of mild weather, the cold and snow will be here soon. We have some winter driving tips and some winter biking tips to help keep you safe this winter.

Photo credit: flickr.com/Don.Harder

Photo credit: flickr.com/Don.Harder

Biking

  1. Layer up but do not overdress – look for clothing that is designed to keep you warm without being too bulky and make you sweat. Many stores sell active wear clothes that are both fashionable and functional. Cover your head, your extremities and your ears, and wear clear glasses to protect your eyes.
  2. Wear something bright and equip your bike with good lights (flashing lights have a great battery life but the high powered ones can blind the motorists behind you), it will keep you safe during low visibility conditions.
  3. Equip your bike with wide tires (studded winter tires are best for icy conditions) and shoes with threaded sole so you won’t slip when you break or stop at a light and you have to put your foot down.
  4. If possible, pick streets that will minimize your contact with cars.
  5. Think safety first! – Use your judgment in snowy, slippery and/or low visibility conditions, actively manage risk through strategies to avoid travel, minimize contact with other traffic and/or make yourself as visible as possible through proper lane positioning.

winter-633965_19201

Driving

If possible, try to avoid driving in bad weather conditions. Don’t go out until the snow plows and sanding trucks have had a chance to do their work, and allow yourself extra time to reach your destination. If you must drive in snowy conditions, make sure your car is prepared, and that you know how to handle road conditions.

Driving safely on icy roads

  1. Decrease your speed and leave yourself plenty of room to stop. You should allow at least three times more space than usual between you and the car in front of you.
  2. Brake gently to avoid skidding. If your wheels start to lock up, ease off the brake.
  3. Turn on your lights to increase your visibility to other motorists.
  4. Keep your lights and windshield clean.
  5. Use low gears to keep traction, especially on hills.
  6. Don’t use cruise control or overdrive on icy roads.
  7. Be especially careful on bridges, overpasses and infrequently traveled roads, which will freeze first. Even at temperatures above freezing, if the conditions are wet, you might encounter ice in shady areas or on exposed roadways like bridges.
  8. Don’t pass snow plows and sanding trucks. The drivers have limited visibility, and you’re likely to find the road in front of them worse than the road behind.
  9. Don’t assume your vehicle can handle all conditions. Even four-wheel and front-wheel drive vehicles can encounter trouble on winter roads.

If your rear wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the accelerator.
  2. Steer in the direction you want the front wheels to go. If your rear wheels are sliding left, steer left. If they’re sliding right, steer right.
  3. If your rear wheels start sliding the other way as you recover, ease the steering wheel toward that side. You might have to steer left and right a few times to get your vehicle completely under control.
  4. If you have standard brakes, pump them gently.
  5. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS), do not pump the brakes. Apply steady pressure to the brakes. You will feel the brakes pulse — this is normal.

If your front wheels skid…

  1. Take your foot off the gas and shift to neutral, but don’t try to steer immediately.
  2. As the wheels skid sideways, they will slow the vehicle and traction will return. As it does, steer in the direction you want to go. Then put the transmission in “drive” or release the clutch, and accelerate gently.

If you get stuck…

  1. Do not spin your wheels. This will only dig you in deeper.
  2. Turn your wheels from side to side a few times to push snow out of the way.
  3. Use a light touch on the gas, to ease your car out.
  4. Use a shovel to clear snow away from the wheels and the underside of the car.
  5. Pour sand, kitty litter, gravel or salt in the path of the wheels, to help get traction.
  6. Try rocking the vehicle. (Check your owner’s manual first — it can damage the transmission on some vehicles.) Shift from forward to reverse, and back again. Each time you’re in gear, give a light touch on the gas until the vehicle gets going.

Sources: National Safety Council, New York State Department of Motor Vehicles, Washington State Government Information & Services