Archive | February, 2013

Spuds, Put Down the Phone!

28 Feb

Mr. Tater tried to text while riding his bike. Never tweet and drive a car or ride a bike. Safety first, Mr. Tater!

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New Jersey’s Deadliest Roads for Pedestrians

27 Feb

For five years in a row, Route 130 (Burlington Pike) in Burlington County has been designated by the Tri-State Transportation Campaign as the deadliest road in New Jersey for pedestrians. This year, Route 130 is tied with the Black Horse Pike in Atlantic County and Route 1 in Middlesex County. Each road had nine fatalities from 2009 to 2011.

“Year in and year out, the pedestrian-unfriendly US-130 continues to threaten the lives of Burlington residents,” Matthew Norris, South Jersey advocate for Tri-State Transportation Campaign, a regional transportation policy watchdog group, said in a press release. “It’s time to make this road safer.”

This analysis identifies the most dangerous roads in the tri-state region for pedestrian fatalities. Looking at federal data from 2009 to 2011, it includes factsheets and online maps that identify the locations of pedestrian fatalities and the age and gender of those killed. Counties in downstate New York and New Jersey that had 10 or more pedestrian fatalities over the three-year period were analyzed, as was the state of Connecticut.

In the three-year stretch, 440 pedestrians died on New Jersey roads, up slightly from the 436 killed from 2008 to 2010 in last year’s survey.

The next six deadliest roadways in the state — which each had eight deaths over the three-year period, included Route 30, also called the White Horse Pike, in Camden County; Route 9 in Middlesex County, Routes 1&9 in Union County, Route 46 in Morris County, Route 9 in Ocean County and JFK Boulevard, also known as Route 501, in Hudson County.

The report found that about 60 percent of pedestrian deaths in New Jersey were on such arterial, or main roads, as Route 130, Routes 1&9 and Route 1 — even though they only make up about 15 percent of roads in the region. TSTC pointed out that arterial roads are typically magnets for big box stores and other businesses, but improvements for pedestrians don’t always come with those new businesses.

In GMTMA’s region, 19 pedestrians were killed on Mercer County roads in the time period studied. US-206, Route 31, Route 653 and Route 129 had the highest number of pedestrian deaths. In Ocean County, 38 pedestrians were killed on Ocean County roads; Route 9, Route 37 and Route 88 had the highest number of pedestrian deaths over the period studied.

TSTC said they hoped that changes introduced by the New Jersey Department of Transportation, including a website for the complete streets program, which accommodates pedestrians and bicyclists, and a workshop focusing on pedestrian safety, would be reflected in future road surveys.

The full report, as well as county fact sheets and maps can be found at: http://tstc.org/reports/danger13/index.php.

Help Your Heart, Get Active!

27 Feb

IMG_2953The Tater family “chillin” after a long bike ride.  Active transportation can help you avoid being one of the 715,000 Americans that have a heart attack each year. #carpotato

Small Fries Can Walk and Bike to School

26 Feb

Small Fry teaches kids how to bike to school safely. Safe Routes to School Programs are available in all areas; it just takes one parent or teacher to get a program set up. GMTMA can help! Learn more about SRTS here.

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Be Safe. Be Seen.

25 Feb

Be safe. Be Seen. Mrs. Tater wears bright colors, reflectors, and/or lights when walking or biking. IMG_3072

Don’t Sit On Your Spud!

20 Feb

chooseSitting on your spud = resting heart rate and zero calories burned. Active transportation = target heart rate and lots of calories burned. And no reason to feel guilty about skipping the gym!

Learn more about active transportation from GMTMA, here.

 

George Washington wants you to ride the rails!

15 Feb

As usual, NJ TRANSIT trains will operate on a ‘weekend/major holiday’ schedule on Presidents’ Day, Monday, February 18, with additional round trips on the Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast, Raritan Valley and Port Jervis lines, and limited service on the Montclair-Boonton and Pascack Valley lines. NJ TRANSIT’s Family Super Saver Fare, which allows up to two children 11 and under to ride free with each fare-paying adult, will remain in effect from 7 p.m. Friday, February 15 until 6 a.m. Tuesday, February 19.

“Early getaway” rail service on Friday, February 15

Today, Friday, February 15, NJ TRANSIT will offer ‘early getaway’ trains between noon and 5 p.m. on the Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast and Morris & Essex lines for the benefit of customers leaving work early for the holiday weekend. Customers are advised to see timetables or visit www.njtransit.com for details.

Presidents’ Day holiday service

On Presidents’ Day, Monday, February 18, trains will operate on a ‘weekend/major holiday’ schedule, with additional round trips on the Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast, Raritan Valley and Port Jervis lines, and limited service on the Montclair-Boonton and Pascack Valley lines, as shown in the timetables. In addition, four Pascack Valley Line trains will depart Hoboken at 2:18 p.m., 4:18 p.m., 5:18 p.m. and 6:20 p.m., stop at Secaucus 10 minutes later, then operate to Spring Valley making all local stops.

Additional trips will operate on the Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast, Raritan Valley and Port Jervis lines. See timetables or visit www.njtransit.com for details.

Holiday bus schedules vary by route-customers are advised to check their timetables or visit www.njtransit.com for schedule information. Newark City Subway will operate on a Saturday schedule; River LINE will operate on a Sunday schedule; and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail will operate on a Saturday/Sunday schedule.

Kids Ride Free on NJT

NJ TRANSIT’s Family Super Saver Fare, which allows up to two children 11 and under to travel free with each fare-paying adult, will be in effect from 7 p.m. Friday, February 15 until 6 a.m. Tuesday, February 19.